Logistics coordinator Jim O'Beirn
Logistics coordinator Jim O'Beirn

Logistics coordinator Jim O'Beirn arrives at the project site in Mkindo. The logistics team are responsible for transporting equipment out to project sites, and for checking that all equipment and facilities are safe for volunteers. 

Making bricks in Mkindo
Making bricks in Mkindo

In the absence of cement mixers, volunteers have to mix sand and cement by hand. Bricks made in this way are used for the foundations of the septic tank.

Digging the cesspit
Digging the cesspit

At the end of six months, Mkindo primary school will have 14 new toilets, one menstrual hygiene management (MHM) room and a hand washing station.

The toilet block in Mkindo
The toilet block in Mkindo

The old toilet block in Mkindo has only 4 drop hole toilets for nearly 1000 children, 2 for boys and 2 for girls. There are no doors on the toilets, no hand washing facilities and no soap. The teachers also use the old block.

Drop hole toilet
Drop hole toilet

One of the drop hole toilets in the old block at Mkindo school. Children are generally barefoot when they use the toilet which can cause and spread illnesses. 

Water tap
Water tap

Most rural schools in tanzania have no access to water facilities on site. In Mkindo they have a single tap, found at the opposite side of the school from the current toilet block.

An outdoor WASH class
An outdoor WASH class
Spreading germs
Spreading germs

The WASH teachers often take lessons outside with the intention of getting the message across in other ways. Volunteer Hannah Fletcher explained “We have a glitter game where the glitter represents germs, when the kids shake hands the glitter is passed on showing how germs spread.”

Practicing hand washing techniques
Practicing hand washing techniques
Elders mobilisation meeting
Elders mobilisation meeting

Throughout the course of a project groups regularly meet with the local community. Meetings are an opportunity to discuss the progress of the project, and to mobilise the community to help with construction work. 

A women’s mobilisation meeting
A women’s mobilisation meeting
WASH hygiene class
WASH hygiene class

During an outdoor WASH class in Bwawani, Raleigh teachers use the true (kweli) and false game to help pupils understand the dangers of unclean water and water born diseases.

Schola Mbilinyi
Schola Mbilinyi

Team leader Schola Mbilinyi, leading a WASH class on home hygiene in Bwawani.

Volunteer Sadick Issa
Volunteer Sadick Issa

laying bricks for the superstructure of the Bwawani toilet block.

Action day in Magaseni
Action day in Magaseni

A man from the village washes his hands with soap, demonstrating to the crowd the 7 stages of hand washing.

Arm wrestling in Magaseni
Arm wrestling in Magaseni

At the action day in Magaseni two men compete in a soapy arm wrestling contest, reinforcing the 7 stages of hand washing to the crowd.

Engaging with the community
Engaging with the community

Action days are a way of inviting people from the village to engage with the project. Often there are DJ's, bands, games and talks from members of the local council. Action days are also a way of breaking down cultural barriers between the team and the villagers.

An action day singing contest
An action day singing contest
Team leader Gerard Elias
Team leader Gerard Elias
Homestay in Magaseni
Homestay in Magaseni

In most rural villages where Raleigh work, there is no running water or electricity. It is common to find car batteries being used as a power source for lighting, and for charging mobile phones. 

2000 bricks made in Magaseni
2000 bricks made in Magaseni
The project site in Magaseni
The project site in Magaseni
Volunteer Shaibu Ahmad
Volunteer Shaibu Ahmad
Sledge hammer
Sledge hammer
Breaking rocks
Breaking rocks
Class room in Sejeli
Class room in Sejeli
Pupils in Sejeli
Pupils in Sejeli
Teaching in Sejeli
Teaching in Sejeli

Teacher and volunteer Kevin Mwihava, leading a hygiene class in Sejeli.

Pupils waiting for a WASH class
Pupils waiting for a WASH class
Sejeli school
Sejeli school
Emiliana leading an MHM class
Emiliana leading an MHM class

There is a significant drop in the number of female students that go on to secondary education in Tanzania. This is often the result of having no previous MHM education, or any separate sanitation facilities for privacy when menstruation begins. 

Kevin working on the toilet block
Kevin working on the toilet block
Volunteer Michael Ulisaja
Volunteer Michael Ulisaja
Plastering in Msunjilile
Plastering in Msunjilile
Volunteer Harry Heaslip
Volunteer Harry Heaslip
Volunteer Kyron Hoare
Volunteer Kyron Hoare
Watering the hand washing station
Watering the hand washing station

The rural villages in Dodoma are remote, and getting water to the project site can be a problem. Water has to be brought in by the help of farmers and stored in large water tanks. Watering the hand washing station helps to avoid the drying out of the plaster.

Downpour in Msunjilile
Downpour in Msunjilile
Team leader Charles Pickering
Team leader Charles Pickering
Downpour
Downpour

Amber, Kate, Oakley and Charles. In the dry, desert region of Dodoma, where accessing water can be a problem, a heavy shower is welcome by the village.

Volunteer Mussa Jonas
Volunteer Mussa Jonas
Volunteer Oakley-Rae Marnoch
Volunteer Oakley-Rae Marnoch
Working on the toilet block mural
Working on the toilet block mural
Project completion
Project completion

Harry outside of his homestay. As the project nears completion, days generally get longer, to ensure the building of the toilet block is finished before the team departs.

Logistics coordinator Jim O'Beirn
Making bricks in Mkindo
Digging the cesspit
The toilet block in Mkindo
Drop hole toilet
Water tap
An outdoor WASH class
Spreading germs
Practicing hand washing techniques
Elders mobilisation meeting
A women’s mobilisation meeting
WASH hygiene class
Schola Mbilinyi
Volunteer Sadick Issa
Action day in Magaseni
Arm wrestling in Magaseni
Engaging with the community
An action day singing contest
Team leader Gerard Elias
Homestay in Magaseni
2000 bricks made in Magaseni
The project site in Magaseni
Volunteer Shaibu Ahmad
Sledge hammer
Breaking rocks
Class room in Sejeli
Pupils in Sejeli
Teaching in Sejeli
Pupils waiting for a WASH class
Sejeli school
Emiliana leading an MHM class
Kevin working on the toilet block
Volunteer Michael Ulisaja
Plastering in Msunjilile
Volunteer Harry Heaslip
Volunteer Kyron Hoare
Watering the hand washing station
Downpour in Msunjilile
Team leader Charles Pickering
Downpour
Volunteer Mussa Jonas
Volunteer Oakley-Rae Marnoch
Working on the toilet block mural
Project completion
Logistics coordinator Jim O'Beirn

Logistics coordinator Jim O'Beirn arrives at the project site in Mkindo. The logistics team are responsible for transporting equipment out to project sites, and for checking that all equipment and facilities are safe for volunteers. 

Making bricks in Mkindo

In the absence of cement mixers, volunteers have to mix sand and cement by hand. Bricks made in this way are used for the foundations of the septic tank.

Digging the cesspit

At the end of six months, Mkindo primary school will have 14 new toilets, one menstrual hygiene management (MHM) room and a hand washing station.

The toilet block in Mkindo

The old toilet block in Mkindo has only 4 drop hole toilets for nearly 1000 children, 2 for boys and 2 for girls. There are no doors on the toilets, no hand washing facilities and no soap. The teachers also use the old block.

Drop hole toilet

One of the drop hole toilets in the old block at Mkindo school. Children are generally barefoot when they use the toilet which can cause and spread illnesses. 

Water tap

Most rural schools in tanzania have no access to water facilities on site. In Mkindo they have a single tap, found at the opposite side of the school from the current toilet block.

An outdoor WASH class
Spreading germs

The WASH teachers often take lessons outside with the intention of getting the message across in other ways. Volunteer Hannah Fletcher explained “We have a glitter game where the glitter represents germs, when the kids shake hands the glitter is passed on showing how germs spread.”

Practicing hand washing techniques
Elders mobilisation meeting

Throughout the course of a project groups regularly meet with the local community. Meetings are an opportunity to discuss the progress of the project, and to mobilise the community to help with construction work. 

A women’s mobilisation meeting
WASH hygiene class

During an outdoor WASH class in Bwawani, Raleigh teachers use the true (kweli) and false game to help pupils understand the dangers of unclean water and water born diseases.

Schola Mbilinyi

Team leader Schola Mbilinyi, leading a WASH class on home hygiene in Bwawani.

Volunteer Sadick Issa

laying bricks for the superstructure of the Bwawani toilet block.

Action day in Magaseni

A man from the village washes his hands with soap, demonstrating to the crowd the 7 stages of hand washing.

Arm wrestling in Magaseni

At the action day in Magaseni two men compete in a soapy arm wrestling contest, reinforcing the 7 stages of hand washing to the crowd.

Engaging with the community

Action days are a way of inviting people from the village to engage with the project. Often there are DJ's, bands, games and talks from members of the local council. Action days are also a way of breaking down cultural barriers between the team and the villagers.

An action day singing contest
Team leader Gerard Elias
Homestay in Magaseni

In most rural villages where Raleigh work, there is no running water or electricity. It is common to find car batteries being used as a power source for lighting, and for charging mobile phones. 

2000 bricks made in Magaseni
The project site in Magaseni
Volunteer Shaibu Ahmad
Sledge hammer
Breaking rocks
Class room in Sejeli
Pupils in Sejeli
Teaching in Sejeli

Teacher and volunteer Kevin Mwihava, leading a hygiene class in Sejeli.

Pupils waiting for a WASH class
Sejeli school
Emiliana leading an MHM class

There is a significant drop in the number of female students that go on to secondary education in Tanzania. This is often the result of having no previous MHM education, or any separate sanitation facilities for privacy when menstruation begins. 

Kevin working on the toilet block
Volunteer Michael Ulisaja
Plastering in Msunjilile
Volunteer Harry Heaslip
Volunteer Kyron Hoare
Watering the hand washing station

The rural villages in Dodoma are remote, and getting water to the project site can be a problem. Water has to be brought in by the help of farmers and stored in large water tanks. Watering the hand washing station helps to avoid the drying out of the plaster.

Downpour in Msunjilile
Team leader Charles Pickering
Downpour

Amber, Kate, Oakley and Charles. In the dry, desert region of Dodoma, where accessing water can be a problem, a heavy shower is welcome by the village.

Volunteer Mussa Jonas
Volunteer Oakley-Rae Marnoch
Working on the toilet block mural
Project completion

Harry outside of his homestay. As the project nears completion, days generally get longer, to ensure the building of the toilet block is finished before the team departs.

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