Arriving into Iyegeya
Arriving into Iyegeya
Iyegeya
Iyegeya

The village of Iyegeya, located along a ridge in the mountains of Mufundi.

Homestay
Homestay

Communications officer Miguel de Palma working late in the homestay. All Raleigh staff stay with families when out on a project. It is good way to learn more about life in the village and to build relationships within the community.

Tube cutting
Tube cutting

Mzigwa Khalid cuts large rolls of vinyl tubing into separate pieces for filling with soil.

Equipment
Equipment

Team leader Amiry Kaiza, gathering equipment from the store room before the group descends on foot to the project site in the valley.

Gathering water
Gathering water

The group have cleared a course for water to run through the project site. Pictured is Gustavo Wangu collecting water for the seedlings. 

Watering seedlings
Watering seedlings
Filling tubes with soil
Filling tubes with soil
Filling tubes
Filling tubes

Volunteers fill tubes with soil.  A target of 150,000 need to be filled by the end of each three month cycle. 

Tubes ready for seedlings
Tubes ready for seedlings
Volunteer Idsart Dikkers
Volunteer Idsart Dikkers
Mzigwa, Ffion and Miguel
Mzigwa, Ffion and Miguel
Counting tubes
Counting tubes
Planting seedlings in tubes
Planting seedlings in tubes

The seedlings inside the tubes will germinate for weeks before they are transplanted to local farms, they will eventually take up to 10 years to grow. 

Soil preperation
Soil preperation

Adam preparing the soil for planting more seedling tubes. He has worked with TFCG since 1999 and is currently working in 9 villages.

TFCG officer Adam
TFCG officer Adam

“Before Raleigh Tanzania we didn’t have volunteers; now we use their time integrating with the community and doing the work the community does. The volunteers gain experience from the community and vice versa. We have seen a very positive impact in the village.”

TFCG officer Adam
TFCG officer Adam

“The villagers are happy to receive volunteers because they know the work will help them for the future, to make money through selling timber and gain knowledge on environmental conservation”.

Group discussion
Group discussion

Christopher Rutayohibwa, at a discussion group on globalisation and climate change. Presentations and discussions are a regular event in village, so volunteers can stay focused on the broader implications of the project.

The Ikaning’ombe tree nursery
The Ikaning’ombe tree nursery

The village of Ikaning’ombe, 20 minutes drive from Iyegeya, previously hosted a natural resource management (NRM) project.

Ikaning’ombe tree nursery
Ikaning’ombe tree nursery

Raleigh volunteers planted over 150,000 tree seedlings in the nearby village of Ikaning’ombe. 

The seedling journey
The seedling journey

The seedling journey really begins after Raleigh depart. Community members continue to closely monitor the site for 6 weeks, which is how long the germination process takes. Once the seedlings grow to 8 inches farmers will begin the transplanting process.

Community engagement
Community engagement

Co-operation between Raleigh with district officials is essential to recruiting villagers to the site, as everything associated with the project is sanctioned by village leaders. 

Maintaining the nursery
Maintaining the nursery

The seedlings were evenly distributed amongst local farmers as part of a long term incentive for them to maintain the site.

Monitoring the site
Monitoring the site

Approximately 30 community members will attend each project site, from three sub-villages in the district. The group is primarily composed of local famers who through their contribution to the project will secure the seedlings that will be transplanted to their farms.

Maria
Maria

“The pines will be beneficial not to me but to the future generation; my children, my grandchildren will benefit from this project. I am just preparing it for the next generation.”

Bee-hive keeping
Bee-hive keeping

Community members are trained in sustainable fishing, bee-hive keeping and tree nurseries. This will encourage them to pursue alternative livelihoods and will help decrease the rate at which trees are being cut down.

Zakaoi in Ikaning’ombe
Zakaoi in Ikaning’ombe

Zakaio, the VEO (village executive officer) at home in Ikaning’ombe. In his garden he has a large pine tree nursery of his own. He says that since the Raleigh project, many villagers have pursued alternative sustainable livelihoods and planted their own trees.

Arriving into Iyegeya
Iyegeya
Homestay
Tube cutting
Equipment
Gathering water
Watering seedlings
Filling tubes with soil
Filling tubes
Tubes ready for seedlings
Volunteer Idsart Dikkers
Mzigwa, Ffion and Miguel
Counting tubes
Planting seedlings in tubes
Soil preperation
TFCG officer Adam
TFCG officer Adam
Group discussion
The Ikaning’ombe tree nursery
Ikaning’ombe tree nursery
The seedling journey
Community engagement
Maintaining the nursery
Monitoring the site
Maria
Bee-hive keeping
Zakaoi in Ikaning’ombe
Arriving into Iyegeya
Iyegeya

The village of Iyegeya, located along a ridge in the mountains of Mufundi.

Homestay

Communications officer Miguel de Palma working late in the homestay. All Raleigh staff stay with families when out on a project. It is good way to learn more about life in the village and to build relationships within the community.

Tube cutting

Mzigwa Khalid cuts large rolls of vinyl tubing into separate pieces for filling with soil.

Equipment

Team leader Amiry Kaiza, gathering equipment from the store room before the group descends on foot to the project site in the valley.

Gathering water

The group have cleared a course for water to run through the project site. Pictured is Gustavo Wangu collecting water for the seedlings. 

Watering seedlings
Filling tubes with soil
Filling tubes

Volunteers fill tubes with soil.  A target of 150,000 need to be filled by the end of each three month cycle. 

Tubes ready for seedlings
Volunteer Idsart Dikkers
Mzigwa, Ffion and Miguel
Counting tubes
Planting seedlings in tubes

The seedlings inside the tubes will germinate for weeks before they are transplanted to local farms, they will eventually take up to 10 years to grow. 

Soil preperation

Adam preparing the soil for planting more seedling tubes. He has worked with TFCG since 1999 and is currently working in 9 villages.

TFCG officer Adam

“Before Raleigh Tanzania we didn’t have volunteers; now we use their time integrating with the community and doing the work the community does. The volunteers gain experience from the community and vice versa. We have seen a very positive impact in the village.”

TFCG officer Adam

“The villagers are happy to receive volunteers because they know the work will help them for the future, to make money through selling timber and gain knowledge on environmental conservation”.

Group discussion

Christopher Rutayohibwa, at a discussion group on globalisation and climate change. Presentations and discussions are a regular event in village, so volunteers can stay focused on the broader implications of the project.

The Ikaning’ombe tree nursery

The village of Ikaning’ombe, 20 minutes drive from Iyegeya, previously hosted a natural resource management (NRM) project.

Ikaning’ombe tree nursery

Raleigh volunteers planted over 150,000 tree seedlings in the nearby village of Ikaning’ombe. 

The seedling journey

The seedling journey really begins after Raleigh depart. Community members continue to closely monitor the site for 6 weeks, which is how long the germination process takes. Once the seedlings grow to 8 inches farmers will begin the transplanting process.

Community engagement

Co-operation between Raleigh with district officials is essential to recruiting villagers to the site, as everything associated with the project is sanctioned by village leaders. 

Maintaining the nursery

The seedlings were evenly distributed amongst local farmers as part of a long term incentive for them to maintain the site.

Monitoring the site

Approximately 30 community members will attend each project site, from three sub-villages in the district. The group is primarily composed of local famers who through their contribution to the project will secure the seedlings that will be transplanted to their farms.

Maria

“The pines will be beneficial not to me but to the future generation; my children, my grandchildren will benefit from this project. I am just preparing it for the next generation.”

Bee-hive keeping

Community members are trained in sustainable fishing, bee-hive keeping and tree nurseries. This will encourage them to pursue alternative livelihoods and will help decrease the rate at which trees are being cut down.

Zakaoi in Ikaning’ombe

Zakaio, the VEO (village executive officer) at home in Ikaning’ombe. In his garden he has a large pine tree nursery of his own. He says that since the Raleigh project, many villagers have pursued alternative sustainable livelihoods and planted their own trees.

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